Episode 54 - Alfred Russell Wallace

February 9, 2019

Happy Darwin Day! Last year around this time, we were joined by Dr. Sarah Bray to discuss the life and times of Charles Darwin. This time, Sarah joins us again to discuss his colleague and natural selection co-discoverer, Alfred Russell Wallace. In 1858, the year before Darwin published his famous book, he received a letter from a young, adventurous, sometimes tragic man in the throes of illness in southeast Asia. To Darwin’s shock, the letter included precisely the same biological insights he had been working on. That letter came from Alfred Russell Wallace.

Find Sarah and her colleagues on the podcast Discovering Darwin! http://discoveringdarwin.blogspot.com/

In the news: fast-evolving mice, a small-headed reptile, an early Antarctic archosaur, and really old amoebae.

Check out our blog for bonus info and pictures:
http://commondescentpodcast.wordpress.com/

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The Intro and Outro music is “On the Origin of Species” by Protodome.
More music like this at http://ocremix.org.

Muscial Interludes are "Professor Umlaut" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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Episode 53 - The Baculum (Penis Bone)

January 26, 2019

It's been called the most diverse of all bones. It comes in an incredible variety of shapes and sizes, living and fossil, scattered across the mammalian family tree. It's called the baculum, the os penis, and in this episode we discuss what it does, who has it, what it means for paleontologists, and the evolutionary processes that made it what it is today.

In the news: whales eating whales, pregnant plesiosaurs, robo-tetrapods, and the first American dogs.

Check out our blog for bonus info and pictures:
http://commondescentpodcast.wordpress.com/

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YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCePRXHEnZmTGum2r1l2mduw

The Intro and Outro music is “On the Origin of Species” by Protodome.
More music like this at http://ocremix.org.

Muscial Interludes are "Professor Umlaut" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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Episode 52 – Sounds of the Past (Fossil Bioacoustics)

January 12, 2019

What did dinosaurs sound like? How did extinct animals make and use sound? Like most behaviors, noises don’t fossilize, but there is some tantalizing evidence that paleontologists have pulled together about fossil bioacoustics. In this episode, we discuss how pop-culture may have misled us, and how scientists have gathered actual clues from living animals and the fossil record – and have even made scientifically-inspired ancient audios! – to reconstruct the sounds of the past.

In the news: hatchling insects, bird brains, old flowers, and dinosaur noses.  

There are some noises in this episode! The living and reconstructed-fossil sounds we played came from these sources:

Great Bittern (Botaurus stellaris) Roger Charters/Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology (ML202485) https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/202485

American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) George B. Reynard/Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology (ML163792) https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/163792

Parasaurolophus sound bite by Sandia National Laboratories and the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science with Paleontologist Tom Williamson and computer scientist Carl Diegert https://www.sandia.gov/media/dinosaur.htm

Katydid Stridulation from Jun-Jie Gu et al 2012. Wing stridulation in a Jurassic katydid (Insecta, Orthoptera) produced low-pitched musical calls to attract females, PNAS (Open access)  https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2012/02/02/1118372109

All the other animal noises were just made by us!

Check out our blog for bonus info and pictures:
http://commondescentpodcast.wordpress.com/

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YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCePRXHEnZmTGum2r1l2mduw

The Intro and Outro music is “On the Origin of Species” by Protodome.
More music like this at http://ocremix.org.

Muscial Interludes are "Professor Umlaut" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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End of the Year Q&A 2018

December 31, 2018
Happy New Year!
 
Big thanks to everyone who's supported us throughout the year, and big thanks to everyone who submitted questions to our Q&A!
Here's roughly two hours of Will and David answering YOUR questions - the silly and the science-y.
 
See you in 2019!
 

The Intro and Outro music is “On the Origin of Species” by Protodome.
More music like this at http://ocremix.org.

Muscial Interludes are "Professor Umlaut" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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Episode 51 - Mosasaurs

December 30, 2018

Many times in the history of life on Earth, reptiles have returned to the oceans. There were three famous groups of marine reptiles during the Mesozoic, and in this episode, we’re discussing the last to evolve, the shortest-lived, and the greatest (in David’s opinion, anyway) of them. We’ll tell the tale of how one group of lizards evolved to dominate waters around the world during the reign of the mosasaurs.

In the news: hunting sabertooths, very strange feathers, megalodon temperature, and feathered(?) pterosaurs.

Check out our blog for bonus info and pictures:
http://commondescentpodcast.wordpress.com/

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iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-common-descent-podcast/id1207586509?mt=2
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCePRXHEnZmTGum2r1l2mduw

The Intro and Outro music is “On the Origin of Species” by Protodome.
More music like this at http://ocremix.org.

Muscial Interludes are "Professor Umlaut" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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Episode 50 - Australia

December 16, 2018

This episode, we take a tour of the land that takes home the prizes for oldest geologic materials, most marsupials, and (arguably) biggest island! Our trip through the history of this island-continent starts nearly at the very origin of our planet, and follows a fascinating history of shifting super-continents and shuffling ecosystems. Join us on a journey Down Under, to Australia.

In the news: Gray Site peccaries, a blubbery ichthyosaur, fossil fungus, and an Australian dinosaur.

Check out our blog for bonus info and pictures:
http://commondescentpodcast.wordpress.com/

Don't forget to submit your question for our End of the Year Q&A:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeZjgAw5vghNPOYJ7e1rKJnqMA-QUn2WgYjM5F4Oj336O49gQ/viewform?usp=sf_link 

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iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-common-descent-podcast/id1207586509?mt=2
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCePRXHEnZmTGum2r1l2mduw

The Intro and Outro music is “On the Origin of Species” by Protodome.
More music like this at http://ocremix.org.

Muscial Interludes are "Professor Umlaut" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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Episode 49 - Fake Fossils

December 2, 2018

It’s no secret we love paleontology; it’s a fascinating field of study. But sometimes our favorite subject is polluted and perverted by fraud. In this episode, we’re talking about fake fossils: why they happen, how they happen, and what effect they have on the paleontological community as a whole. And then it’s story time, where we review some of history’s most famous fossil fakes.

In the news: an early long-neck, tiny footprints, a huge dicynodont surprise, and the marsupial lion.

Check out our blog for bonus info and pictures:
http://commondescentpodcast.wordpress.com/

Don't forget to submit your question for our End of the Year Q&A:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeZjgAw5vghNPOYJ7e1rKJnqMA-QUn2WgYjM5F4Oj336O49gQ/viewform?usp=sf_link 

Follow and Support us on:
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Twitter: https://twitter.com/CommonDescentPC
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PodBean: https://commondescentpodcast.podbean.com/
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-common-descent-podcast/id1207586509?mt=2
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCePRXHEnZmTGum2r1l2mduw

The Intro and Outro music is “On the Origin of Species” by Protodome.
More music like this at http://ocremix.org.

Muscial Interludes are "Professor Umlaut" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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Episode 48 - Sharks

November 18, 2018

This episode, it’s back into the ocean, this time to discuss one of the most successful groups of predators on the planet. Sharks are famously “ancient,” but their evolutionary story is complex and fascinating, stretching back more than 400 million years, from their assorted bizarre ancestors to the incredible diversity we see today.

In the news: nocturnal elephant birds, hadrosaur sounds, prehistoric protein preservation, and colorful dino eggs.

Check out our blog for bonus info and pictures:
http://commondescentpodcast.wordpress.com/

Don't forget to submit your question for our End of the Year Q&A:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeZjgAw5vghNPOYJ7e1rKJnqMA-QUn2WgYjM5F4Oj336O49gQ/viewform?usp=sf_link 

Follow and Support us on:
Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/commondescentpodcast
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PodBean: https://commondescentpodcast.podbean.com/
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-common-descent-podcast/id1207586509?mt=2
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCePRXHEnZmTGum2r1l2mduw

The Intro and Outro music is “On the Origin of Species” by Protodome.
More music like this at http://ocremix.org.

Muscial Interludes are "Professor Umlaut" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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Episode 47 - Early Synapsids (”Proto-Mammals”)

November 4, 2018

Synapsids are a vast group of animals that includes only one living lineage: us mammals. But for about 100 million years before true mammals evolved, ancient synapsids were not only incredibly diverse, but dominant in ecosystems around the world. In this episode, we’ll explore some of this incredible variety of “proto-mammals” and track the long evolutionary transition that produced all the familiar traits that make us mammalian.

In the news: a new living croc, a carnivorous herbivorous dinosaur, strange old footprints, and fish origins.

Check out our blog for bonus info and pictures:
http://commondescentpodcast.wordpress.com/

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iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-common-descent-podcast/id1207586509?mt=2
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCePRXHEnZmTGum2r1l2mduw

The Intro and Outro music is “On the Origin of Species” by Protodome.
More music like this at http://ocremix.org.

Muscial Interludes are "Professor Umlaut" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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Spook-E - Zombies

October 27, 2018

Welcome ... to Spookulative Evolution.

It's October, so we're exploring some more speculative evolution with a spooky twist! Each week this month, we'll be choosing a creepy creature and discussing how it - or something like it - might evolve biologically, pulling inspiration from the critters of the real world.

In this particularly disturbing episode, we consider mindless decomposing humans and parasitic host manipulation. How can we naturally arrive at a contagion that converts people into flesh-eating hoards? Our creature to create: Zombies.

Follow and Support us on:
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iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-common-descent-podcast/id1207586509?mt=2
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCePRXHEnZmTGum2r1l2mduw

The Intro and Outro music is “On the Origin of Species” by Protodome.
More music like this at http://ocremix.org.

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